Emord & Associates is dedicated to serving the needs of its national client base. The firm’s attorneys represent clients in constitutional and administrative law cases before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Department of Justice (DOJ), the Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the National Park Service (NPS), the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

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Telephone: (202) 466-6937

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Attorney Jonathan Emord discussed the corrupt relationship between the FDA and 'Big Pharma'.

"Without question the FDA's system  for drug approval is broken and results in horrific consequences both when it approves drugs and when it denies terminally-ill patients access to drugs," he stated. The FDA plays favorites with

large pharmaceutical companies, Emord continued, citing the example of a Sanofi-Aventis drug called Ketek that was approved even after it had been revealed the primary clinical trials were entirely made up. Perhaps even worse than approving potentially unsafe drugs, the FDA often denies patients access to promising experimental treatments. A drug called Gleevec was found effective in treating Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia yet the FDA denied, and essentially condemned to death, thousands of patients, Emord said. Eighty percent of the few subjects allowed to receive the treatment are still alive, he added.